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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
qaeda, the taliban, and its associated forces. second, in this conflict, as indeed in any conflict, the united states is lawfully entitled. and finally, whatever the constitution's due process guarantees may require before targeting a u.s. citizen, these requirements are more than satisfied by rigorous judgment that a person needs the administration's narrow targeting. to understand why this position must be correct, consider a domestic hostage situation. in such a situation, even law enforcement will use this command it will do so without judicial preapproval when the threats of the lives of the hostages is serious. nobody takes the position that such actions constitute and killings. it is not profoundly different from this hostage situation. a mounting chorus of critics has insisted that judicial review must be a feature of the framework that authorizes the targeting of american nationals. whatever the merit of these mechanisms, one point is very clear. current law simply does not provide for prospective judicial involvement in targeting decisions. it is therefore hard for having
was banned for years by the taliban. now with help from the state department, the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony. 13-year-old leila zhari has been waiting two years for this moment, the chance to perform on the world stage, while breaking another taliban taboo, girls and boys playing music together. which do you like better, the drums or the trumpet? which is more fun? >> the drums. >> reporter: the drums? she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan. where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they're nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sound from their homeland. the tambor, meksed with western harmonies they're also learning. organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> the future of afghanistan, where the children of the country are, the future and that hope is not dead. >> reporter: how does it fe
were attacked by 300 taliban fighters at combat outpost keating. he led a desperate day-long battle despite being wounded, and killed at least ten insurgents himself. at the white house today, president obama said romesha risked his life to rescue the wounded and retrieve bodies. >> clint romesha lives the soldier's creed: "i will never leave a fallen comrade." so he and his team started charging as enemy fire poured down, and they kept charging, 50 meters, 80 meters, ultimately 100 meters run through a hail of bullets. they reached their fallen friends, and they brought them home. >> sreenivasan: romesha is only the fourth living medal of honor recipient for actions in iraq or afghanistan. on wall street today, trading was light, and stocks drifted lower. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 21 points to close at 13,971. the nasdaq fell a little less than two points to close at 3192. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: and we turn to the search for the ex-officer wanted in multiple killings in california. authorities have been given hu
at the bottom of three steep mountains woke up to an overwhelming attack by the taliban, very smart attack, up to 400 taliban fighters and it seemed impossible and i asked clint rome romechier on monday who is going to be award the the medal of honor, what it was like to face these impossible odds. throughout all of this, did you ever think this is it? i'm not going to get out of here. >> it's like a fighter going into the boxing ring, you know, if you think you're going to lose before you even step into the ring, you've already lost. you're there to win, you're there to fight, you're there to, you know, your brothers to your left and right are depending on you so you don't have that in you. >> when you talk about an overwhelming force describe to me what overwhelming is. >> it's the kind of thing where every time they opened a door to run out to deliver ammunition, a sniper would pick one of them off. there were five guys trapped in a humvee for hours, three men trapped in the mortar pit for hours. the first guy killed was running to a machine gun in the corner of the camp to return fire, kil
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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